Reflection #2

In what ways have the FLC discussions influenced you to reexamine the measures your program currently uses to assess its program learning outcomes?

I have learned a great deal about the various ways to implement learning outcomes and their assessment measures into the program throughout the students’ coursework. Instead of focusing only on assessing measures found in the capstone course, I have learned that a more useful analysis of the program could be found throughout various stages of the students’ development. Therefore, I will propose that we assess the learning outcomes in courses in addition to the capstone course.
This approach will allow for a more responsive, fluid and dynamic assessment of our program. I think the ongoing assessment measures through a variety of classes will be useful to make necessary changes as needed, rather than waiting until the end of a students’ program.

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re: assessment plan for Women’s Studies

A. Learning outcomes:
A committee of core faculty in the Institute for Women’s Studies developed the procedures for collecting and analyzing data to determine if each learning outcome had been obtained. A graduate of the AB in Women’s Studies should be able to achieve the following learning outcomes:
1) Show interdisciplinary understanding of how gender is constructed and represented
2) Demonstrate a theoretical understanding of oppression, including the notion of intersecting forms (or a matrix) of oppression
3) Explain and compare different perspectives of feminist thought
4) Critique research studies by describing and understanding feminist research methods
5) Apply theoretical and methodological concepts in praxis

B. Analysis of Data and Assessment Methods and Procedures
1) Sample of assignments from core courses: The questions from these assignments were developed by faculty members to assess individual learning outcomes and test how well the student recalls, interprets, and/or applies concepts and facts relating to the discipline. Assignments from the core courses cover the different perspectives of feminist thought, feminist research methods, interdisciplinary understanding of gender, theoretical understanding of oppression, and the application of theoretical and methodological concepts.
Possible sources for samples:
WMST 3010
WMST 3110
WMST 4010
WMST 4011
WMST 4900
The samples will be rated on a 1-5 scale as follows:
1. Unacceptable
2. Poor
3. Satisfactory
4. Very Good
5. Excellent
Target scores for each question (3.0 or better) will indicate a level of learning that we find desirable for our majors.
The samples were evaluated according to a rubric approved by faculty members of the steering committee. The grading rubric was used to evaluate students’ ability to meet the learning outcomes. This sample represents a shift to incorporate quantitative data into the assessment methods and procedures.

 

Questions:

1. Discuss at least two ways that feminist researchers questioned the idea of “objectivity” in methodology. (Learning outcome 4)

2. Explain what is meant by the phrase “a matrix of oppression” or “intersecting forms of oppression.” (Learning outcome 2)

3. Postmodern feminism critiques binary oppositions and so questions the categories of “woman” and “man, ““femininity” and “masculinity,” and “homosexuality” and “heterosexuality.” (learning outcomes 1, 3 and 5)
a. In what ways might this questioning or deconstruction of categories be liberatory for women and men?

b. On the other hand, in what ways might this questioning or deconstruction of categories be constricting for women?

4. Choose two important goals of liberal or radical feminism and discuss what forces you see at work in their relative successes. (learning outcomes 3 and 5)

5. Explain one difference between first, second and third wave feminists (e.g., goals, strategies for change, understanding of gender differences, etc.). (learning outcomes 1 and 3)

6. How have intersections of race, class, and gender influenced the feminisms of women of color in the United States? How have these insights transformed feminist research and practice? (learning outcomes 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5)

7. Women’s studies emphasizes praxis, the practical application of its intellectual theories. Do you expect to engage in activism when you leave UGA? If so, do you feel your women’s studies training has prepared you for your activist initiatives? Please explain. (learning outcome 5)

 

2. Focus group: Faculty members will visit the capstone class (WMST 4900) and ask students theoretical and applied questions related to course work in Women’s Studies. This oral exam provides a mean for faculty to assess students’ knowledge and ability to communicate about Women’s Studies. The focus group has been a productive place to address the learning outcomes that are expected results of the AB program in Women’s Studies. This focus group provides a useful source of qualitative data and the summaries from the focus group indicate areas of strength and areas needing improvement.

 

C) Use of Assessment Evidence

Curriculum committee members will present the findings report to the steering committee members. The report will include recommendations based on the assessment results. The recommendations may include changes to the major requirements, the courses, and the curriculum offerings. Steering committee members will be given the opportunity to discuss the results and the recommendations before giving final approval of the report.

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Learning Outcomes Assessment Plan –biological enigneering

Learning Outcomes Assessment Plan –biological enigneering

Learning Outcomes

Graduates will have

a)      an ability to apply knowledge of the mathematical, physical, biological and engineering sciences

b)      an ability to design and conduct experiments as well as to analyze and interpret data

c)      an ability to implement logical design methodology in order to meet desired needs

d)      an ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams

e)      an ability to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems

f)       the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context

g)      a recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in life-long learning

h)      a knowledge of contemporary issues

i)        an ability to use techniques, skills and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice

II. Assessment Measures and Assessment Cycle

  • Senior Exit Interviews
  • Student focus groups by student classification (e.g. freshmen)
  • Milestone courses
  • Faculty assessment of student performance by each course in the curriculum
  • Student assessment of the enrolled course (by course learning objectives)
  • Course learning objectives mapped to learning outcomes
  • Industry assessment of student performance in key courses (e.g. capstone courses)
  • Alumni assessment
  • Employer assessment

 

Outcomes-Measures Mapping and Timeline

 

Senior Exit Interviews

Student focus groups

Faculty assessment

Student assessment

Industry assessment

Alumni assessment

Employer Assessment

Milestone courses

 

Each semester

Each academic year

Each semester

Each semester

May

 

 

Each Semester

a

X

X

X

X

 

 

 

x

b

X

X

X

X

 

 

 

x

c

X

X

X

X

 

 

 

x

d

X

X

X

X

 

 

 

x

e

X

X

X

X

 

 

 

x

f

X

X

X

X

 

 

 

 

g

 

 

 

 

X

x

x

 

h

X

X

 

 

x

x

x

 

i

X

 

 

 

x

 

 

 

j

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

k

 

 

X

X

 

x

x

 

 

Faculty Involvement

  • Each faculty member is expected to assess student performance in each time the faculty member teaches.  A sub-set of faculty members will be assigned to a milestone course where particular assignments are used to assess student performance.  Each faculty member reports her/his findings at the end of the semester the course is taught.
  • A faculty curriculum committee will review assessment findings. A third party specializing in assessment will analyze the raw data and provide a report of the findings to this committee. The committee will determine actions to take regarding the assessment.
  • The chair of the curriculum committee will present recommendation for curricula or course changes to the entire college faculty. The faculty will determine final actions to implement. The engineering academic office in conjunction with the curriculum committee will implement these actions.

 

 Use of assessment evidence

  • The assessment findings will be used to

o   Modify course content

o   Modify sequencing of courses

o   Modify the overall design of a curriculum

 

 

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FLC Final Celebration Tuesday, April 29, 2:30 – 4:30, MLC Reading Room

Learning to Assess Learning, 2013-14

What is learning outcomes assessment?  How are you supposed to do it?  What does it do for you?  Join other faculty members to explore learning outcomes assessment and to find out how it can be done in order to benefit the teacher, the learner, and the program.  Members of this FLC will work through the assessment cycle, from clearly defining outcomes statements to collecting evidence to using assessment to improve teaching and learning.  At regular intervals participants will apply group discussions to advance their own course or programmatic assessment efforts. Faculty with all levels of assessment experience are welcome.

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Romance Languages Assessment Plan

Romance Languages assessment plan

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Romance Languages Program Outcomes REVISED

1. Students will read and interpret sophisticated texts in a target language.

2. Students will complete a semester project in a target language displaying analytical or research skills appropriate to the discipline.

3. Students will demonstrate self-awareness of one’s own speech and ability to communicate with educated speakers in one or more target languages.

4. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the features of the language, literature and culture of one or more target countries.

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Revised outcomes for TXMI 4300

TXMI 4300

Studio IV:  Universal and Sustainable Residential Design

 

  • Apply the principles of Universal Design and Sustainable Interior Design practices, including local building codes, IBC, ADAAG and LEED.
  • Demonstrate a conceptual understanding of design, including the development of construction documents for single-family projects.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of course materials from previous design studio classes
  • Gain experience working with other designers on design projects.

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Filed under Course Learning Outcomes, Textiles, Merchandising & Interiors